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Two House Democrats break ranks with Pelosi on impeachment rules vote -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Two House Democrats break ranks with Pelosi on impeachment rules vote

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Two House Democrats break ranks with Pelosi on impeachment rules vote

89___.gifTwo House Democrats break ranks with Pelosi on impeachment rules vote 2472758156.gif

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A divided House endorses impeachment inquiry




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Two House Democrats broke ranks with their party leadership on Thursday's highly-contentious vote for a resolution setting the rules for the impeachment inquiry into President Trump.
AAJDM2w.img?h=533&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f© Alex Wong/Getty Images Rep. Jeff Van Drew, D-N.J., opposed the impeachment resolution.
The resolution passed 232-196 but lacked votes from Reps. Jeff Van Drew, D-N.J., who has long expressed skepticism about impeachment, and Collin Peterson, D-Minn., whose district Trump won by 31 points. No Republicans voted for the resolution, signaling that the House GOP still stands firmly behind Trump as he comes under heavy fire.
"At the end of the day we’ll have the same president and same candidate and a failed impeachment process, and the only difference would be that the president will have been exonerated of charges," Van Drew said in a statement to Fox News.
DEMS PUSH IMPEACHMENT RULES OVER REPEATED GOP OBJECTIONS, AS EXASPERATION BOILS OVER
House committees have held nearly a dozen depositions of witnesses who have testified behind closed doors about their knowledge of a July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. It's been alleged, by an anonymous whistleblower, among others, that Trump sought to persuade the foreign leader to open an investigation into 2020 presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter's business dealings in Ukraine in exchange for military aid to that nation.
Van Drew said that although he "feels concerned with many of the allegations related to the president," he doesn't think it's enough to warrant Trump's removal from office.
Peterson is one of two Democrats remaining in the House who voted to authorize impeachment against Bill Clinton in 1998.
SEN. BLACKBURN: DEMOCRATS ARE ONLY HOLDING IMPEACHMENT VOTE AFTER 'FLAK' FROM CRITICS
Other Democrats said their support for Thursday's resolution was not necessarily an indication of how they would vote on possible impeachment articles. Freshman Rep. Kendra Horn, D-Okla., announced she would vote for the resolution while making clear it was not a vote for impeachment — just to authorize the rules for impeachment hearings. Trump carried Horn’s district by 13 points in 2016. Horn won her seat last fall in what some observers called an upset.
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Slide 1 of 69: SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 15: An electronic billboard in the Fisherman's Wharf area of San Francisco reads "IMPEACH" with an image of U.S. President Donald Trump on October 15, 2019 in San Francisco, California. The Courage Campaign commissioned the billboard calling for impeachment as an impeachment inquiry by Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives is underway in Washington D.C.
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1/69 SLIDES © Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

On Sept. 25, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi initiated an impeachment inquiry against President Trump, following a whistleblower complaint over his dealings with Ukraine.
(Pictured) Donald Trump, accompanied by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, speaks on Oct. 23 in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, D.C.





2/69 SLIDES © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. gavels as the House votes 232-196 to pass a resolution on impeachment procedure to move forward into the next phase of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump, in the House Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 31. The resolution authorizes the next stage of the impeachment inquiry into Trump, including establishing the format for open hearings, giving the House Committee on the Judiciary the final recommendation on impeachment, and allowing Trump and his lawyers to attend events and question witnesses.





3/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Former top national security adviser to President Donald Trump, Tim Morrison, arrives for a closed-door meeting to testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry into Trump, on Oct. 31.




4/69 SLIDES © Mark Wilson/Getty Images

U.S. House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) walks to attend testimony from Timothy Morrison, National Security Council’s Russia and Europe Director, at a closed-door deposition, on Oct. 31.




5/69 SLIDES © Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., right, speaks to members of the media as Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, left, looks on as they arrive for a closed-door meeting to hear testimony from Tim Morrison, on Oct. 31.




6/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., speaks to reporters as he leaves a closed door meeting where Catherine Croft, a State Department adviser on Ukraine, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 30.




7/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

The House of Representatives Rules Committee Chairman James McGovern (D-MA) talks with an aide as he chairs a Rules Committee markup hearing to prepare a resolution directing House congressional committees to continue their ongoing investigations in the impeachment inquiry, on Oct. 30.




8/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi talks to reporters encountered as she walks near the room where witnesses are testifying in the impeachment inquiry led by the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight and Reform Committees on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 30.




9/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

House Rules Committee members Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., right, work on the markup of the resolution that will formalize the next steps in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, on Oct. 30.




10/69 SLIDES © Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Christopher Anderson (C), a State Department employee arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol, on Oct. 30.




11/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) speaks to reporters outside the House Intelligence Committee SCIF as U.S. foreign service officer Catherine Croft, who once served as a deputy to then-Special Envoy for Ukraine Kurt Volker, testifies inside as part of the House of Representatives impeachment inquiry, on Oct. 30.




12/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

The U.S. House of Representatives Rules Committee holds a markup hearing to prepare a resolution directing House congressional committees to continue their ongoing investigations in the impeachment inquiry into the President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 30.




13/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

U.S. foreign service officer Catherine Croft, who once served as a deputy to then-Special Envoy for Ukraine Kurt Volker, arrives to testify as part of the House of Representatives impeachment inquiry into the President Trump led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Oct. 30.




14/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Rep. Rob Woodall, R-Ga., a member of the House Rules Committee, argues a point during a markup of the resolution that will formalize the next steps in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol, on Oct. 30, 2019.




15/69 SLIDES © Erin Scott/Reuters

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N) and Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY) speak to reporters while Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, director for European Affairs at the National Security Council, testifies as part of the U.S. House of Representatives impeachment inquiry into President Trump led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 29.





16/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., arrives for a Democratic caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 29. Her panel is one of the key committees with jurisdiction in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.





17/69 SLIDES © Erin Scott/Reuters

U.S. House Intelligence Committee Chair Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) exits a closed-door deposition of U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland as part of the U.S. House of Representatives impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 28.





18/69 SLIDES © Patrick Semansky/AP Photo

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, center, speaks with members of the media after former deputy national security adviser Charles Kupperman signaled that he would not appear as scheduled for a closed door meeting to testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, Monday, Oct. 28, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Standing with Jordan are Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., left, and Rep. Michael Conaway, R-Texas.





19/69 SLIDES © Michael Reynolds/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell participates in a news conference on Oct. 29, in Washington. Republican Senators took the opportunity to criticize House Democrats' approach to an impeachment probe into President Donald J. Trump.




20/69 SLIDES © Jim Bourg/Reuters

A draft of a U.S. House of Representatives resolution formally laying out the next steps in the Democratic impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, authorizing public committee hearings and the public release of transcripts of closed-door depositions, is seen after its release on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 29.




21/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Impeachment

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, director for European Affairs at the National Security Council, arrives to testify as part of the U.S. House of Representatives impeachment inquiry into President Trump led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 29.





22/69 SLIDES © Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) speaks to reporters before entering a closed-door deposition on Oct. 29.




23/69 SLIDES © Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images

From left, Reps. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., Kelly Armstrong, R-N.D., Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and Scott Perry, R-Pa., conduct a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center outside the deposition of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, on Oct. 29.




24/69 SLIDES © Jose Luis Magana/AP Photo

Philip Reeker, the acting assistant secretary of state for Europe, leaves the Capitol in Washington after a closed-door interview on Oct. 26. Reeker took questions about President Donald Trump's ouster of the ambassador of Ukraine in May and whether he had knowledge about efforts to persuade Ukraine to pursue politically motivated investigations.






25/69 SLIDES © Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Subcommittee chairman Rep. Stephen Lynch (D-MA) leaves the impeachment inquiry proceedings on Oct. 26.




26/69 SLIDES © Jose Luis Magana/AP Photo

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks with the media outside of the closed door interview for Acting Assistant Secretary of State Philip Reeker at the Capitol in Washington on Oct. 26. Like other impeachment inquiry witnesses, the Trump administration has directed Reeker not to testify, according to a person familiar with the situation who insisted on anonymity to discuss the interaction. But Reeker appeared anyway after receiving his subpoena from the House, the person said.




27/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, one of President Donald Trump's chief allies, says he will introduce a resolution condemning the Democratic-controlled House for pursuing a "closed door, illegitimate impeachment inquiry," during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, on Oct. 24.
The non-binding resolution by the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman gives Senate Republicans a chance to show support for the president at a moment when Trump is urging his allies to get tougher and fight harder for him.





28/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., flanked by Rep. Russ Fulcher, R-Idaho, left, and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, the ranking member of the Committee on Oversight Reform, right, and other conservative House Republicans, complain to reporters about how House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is conducting the impeachment investigation on Oct. 23 at the Capitol in Washington.




29/69 SLIDES © Yuri Gripas/Reuters

Congressman Adam Schiff (D-CA) leaves after a closed-door deposition from Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper as part of the U.S. House of Representatives impeachment inquiry on Oct. 23.




30/69 SLIDES © Patrick Semansky/AP

Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., speaks at a news conference in front of House Republicans after Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper arrived for a closed door meeting to testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, on Oct. 23. Close to two dozen Republicans had attempted to enter a secure room where Cooper was scheduled to testify.





31/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Former Ambassador William Taylor leaves a closed door meeting after testifying as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 22.




32/69 SLIDES © Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Donald Trump speaks as Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (L) and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listen during a cabinet meeting at the Cabinet Room of the White House, on Oct. 21, in Washington, DC. Trump held a cabinet meeting to discuss his administration’s agenda and made extensive remarks about impeachment and the situation on the Syrian/Turkish border.




33/69 SLIDES © Erin Scott/Reuters

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) arrives with Rep. Juan Vargas (D-CA) to hear testimony from U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland behind closed-doors, as part of the impeachment inquiry led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Oct. 17.






34/69 SLIDES © Win McNamee/Getty Images

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney answers questions during a briefing at the White House Oct. 17 in Washington, DC. Mulvaney answered a range of questions relating to the issues surrounding the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, and other issues during the briefing.





35/69 SLIDES © Carlos Jasso/Reuters

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump rally against the congressional impeachment inquiry outside the U.S. Capitol building, on Oct. 17.




36/69 SLIDES © Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

US Ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland (C) arrives at the US Capitol on Oct. 17, in Washington, DC. Sondland will appear before Congress for a closed deposition on the Ukraine scandal.





37/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Michael McKinley, a former top aide to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, leaves Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 16, after testifying before congressional lawmakers as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.




38/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., right, and Education and Labor Committee Chairman Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., left, speak as they leave a news conference to unveil the College Affordability Act on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 15.




39/69 SLIDES © Leah Millis/Reuters

George Kent, deputy assistant secretary of state for Europe and Eurasian Affairs, arrives to testify at a closed-door deposition as part of the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 15.




40/69 SLIDES © Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The US President's former top Russia adviser, Fiona Hill (C) leaves after a deposition for the House Intelligence committee regarding an impeachment inquiry Oct. 14 in Washington, DC. Hill, who was subpoenaed by the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees for closed door depositions, is among the handful of current and former Trump administration members being interviewed this week by House panels.






41/69 SLIDES © Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

A Congressional aide carries a box of documents following Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) (R) on Capitol Hill on Oct. 14 in Washington, DC.




42/69 SLIDES © Karla Ann Cote/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Hundreds of activists marched from Times Square to Union Square on Oct. 13 in New York City.





43/69 SLIDES © Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he departs for travel to Minnesota from the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 10. The president spoke about the impeachment investigation, the Turkish incursion into Syria, and the Giuliani associates arrested today at Dulles airport on charges of violating campaign finance rules.






44/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, left, arrives on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 11, in Washington, as she is scheduled to testify before congressional lawmakers on Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.






45/69 SLIDES © Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, arrives for an expected meeting with former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 11.




46/69 SLIDES © Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Representatives Jim Jordan (R-OH) (L), ranking member of the House Oversight Committee, and Lee Zeldin (R-NY) (R) walk down the spiral staircase in the basement of the Capitol on Oct. 11. House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs, House Oversight and Reform Committee are taking a deposition from former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch as part of the impeachment inquiry.




47/69 SLIDES © Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo

Kevin Downing, right, attorney representing two Florida businessmen Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, leaves the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Virginia, on Oct. 10. Two Florida businessmen tied to President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani have been arrested on campaign finance violations resulting from a $325,000 donation to a political action committee supporting Trump's re-election.





48/69 SLIDES © Brenna Norman/Reuters

Mike Pence answers questions from the press about the whistleblower and President Trump’s call with the president of Ukraine following his remarks on the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) at Manning Farms in Waukee, Iowa, Oct. 9.






49/69 SLIDES © Elise Amendola/AP Photo

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a campaign event, on Oct. 9, 2019, in Rochester, N.H. For the first time, he called for the impeachment of Donald Trump saying, "Donald Trump has violated his oath of office, betrayed the nation, and committed impeachable acts."






50/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, arrives to give a statement to members of the media on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8. The Trump administration barred Gordon Sondland, the U.S. European Union ambassador, from appearing before a House panel conducting the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.





51/69 SLIDES © Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. House impeachment investigation during a formal signing ceremony for the U.S.-Japan Trade Agreement at the White House in Washington, on Oct. 7.






52/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the intelligence community, arrives at the Capitol where he will go behind closed doors to be questioned about the whistleblower complaint that exposed a July phone call the president had with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in which Trump pressed for an investigation of Democratic political rival Joe Biden and his family, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 4.




53/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Kurt Volker, a former special envoy to Ukraine, arrives for a closed-door interview with House investigators, as House Democrats proceed with the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 3.





54/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP

President Donald Trump speaks to the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 3, before boarding Marine One for a trip to Florida. He told reporters, "China should start an investigation into the Bidens because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine."






55/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is joined by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., at a news conference as House Democrats move ahead in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington on Oct. 2.






56/69 SLIDES © Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks with reporters during a meeting with Finland's President Sauli Niinisto in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Oct. 2.





57/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

The entrance to a secure facility used by the House Intelligence Committee is seen on Oct. 1.




58/69 SLIDES © Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky speaks to the media on Oct. 1, in Kiev, Ukraine.





59/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media as he departs a ceremonial swearing in ceremony for new Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Sept. 30.





60/69 SLIDES © Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Vice President Mike Pence, President Donald Trump, and Defense Secretary Mark Esper, participate in an Armed Forces welcome ceremony for the new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley on Sept. 30, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Va.





61/69 SLIDES © Jeff Neira/Walt Disney Television/Getty Images

Rudy Giuliani, President Donald Trump's personal attorney, defended himself on "This Week with George Stephanopoulos" from accusations lodged by a former White House official that he has trafficked unfounded theories about foreign interference in the 2016 presidential election, on Sept. 29.





62/69 SLIDES © Alex Wong/Getty Images

The first page of the unclassified memorandum of U.S. President Donald Trump’s phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is shown on Sept. 27.




63/69 SLIDES © Paul Morigi/Getty Images for MoveOn Political Action

Members of Congress and activists support an immediate inquiry towards articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the “Impeachment Now!” rally on Sept. 26, in Washington, D.C.




64/69 SLIDES © Zach Gibson/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a weekly news conference on Capitol Hill on Sept. 26, in Washington, DC. Speaker Pelosi discussed an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.




65/69 SLIDES © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Brett Heinz of Washington and other activists rally for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, on Sept. 26.




66/69 SLIDES © Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y. holds up a copy of a White House-released rough transcript of a phone call between President Donald Trump and the President of Ukraine as Schumer speaks to the media about an impeachment inquiry on President Trump, on Sept. 25, on Capitol Hill.





67/69 SLIDES © Lucas Jackson/Reuters

A woman hands out fake "special editions" of the Washington Post to passing pedestrians while taking part in a demonstration in support of impeachment hearings in New York, on Sept. 26.




68/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., talks to Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, after Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire testified before the House Intelligence Committee on Sept. 26.




69/69 SLIDES © Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Joseph Maguire testifies on Sept. 26.




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Slideshow by photo services
Republicans have kept their arguments against impeachment largely to the process Democrats have used to pursue it, saying that a rules resolution like the one passed Thursday was used to authorize impeachment proceedings against both Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton and should be passed this time around as well. There is no requirement in the Constitution or House Rules, however, requiring such a resolution to authorize an impeachment inquiry.
In a letter to Democratic colleagues Monday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she was bringing the rules resolution to the floor specifically to take that talking point away from Republicans.
WHITE HOUSE OFFICIAL WHO FLAGGED UKRAINE CONCERNS TESTIFIES IN IMPEACHMENT PROBE
“We are taking this step to eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives," Pelosi said.
Republican representatives, however, have not been satisfied with the move, saying that the impeachment inquiry is already discredited by the secret hearings and bias against Trump from Democrats.
"It's clear Pelosi needs to declare a mistrial," Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., said Tuesday as he and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, accused House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., of stopping a witness from answering certain Republican questions during a deposition. "This has been a tainted process from the start. What happened today confirms even worse just how poorly Adam Schiff is handling this process, denying the ability for Republicans to even ask basic questions that are critical to the heart of whether or not a President of the United States is impeached."
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Additionally, on the House floor on Thursday, Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., said Republicans offered 17 amendments to the impeachment resolution and "not one" was accepted. Rep. Ross Spano, R-Fla., also criticized the resolution, noting Republicans will be unable to subpoena witnesses without the approval of Schiff, echoing a criticism other Republicans have leveled about the impeachment rules resolution released Tuesday.
Rep. Justin Amash, I-Mich., who left the Republican caucus this year after a longstanding tiff with Trump and much of the GOP, also voted for the resolution Thursday.
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