Sign in to follow this  
ELPASSO

Victoria Woodhull-Equal Rights candidate for President of the United States

Recommended Posts

Victoria Woodhull-Equal Rights candidate for President of the United States

 

Victoria Woodhull-Equal Rights candidate for President of the United States
avatar_7.gif?dateline=1557078814
 Elpasso  
 
Victoria Woodhull
Victoria Woodhull
250x0https://img2.tfd.com/wiki/thumbs/2/23/250px-Victoria_Woodhull_by_Mathew_Brady_c1870.jpg[/img][Image: wikiimg.ashx?p=commons%2fthumb%2f7%2f71%..._c1870.png]

Equal Rights candidate for
President of the United States

Election date
1872
Personal details
Born
Victoria California Claflin
September 23, 1838
HomerOhio, U.S.
Died
June 9, 1927 (aged 88)[1]
Bredon's Norton,Worcestershire, England
Restingplace
Cremated remains scattered atsea from Newhaven, Sussex,England
Nationality
American
Politicalparty
Equal Rights
Spouse(s)
Canning Woodhull
(m. 1853; div. 18??)
Colonel James Blood
(m. 1865; div. 1876)
John Biddulph Martin
(m. 1883; his death 1901)
Children
Byron Woodhull
Zula Maude Woodhull
Parents
Reuben Buckman Claflin
Roxanna Hummel Claflin
Relatives
Tennessee Claflin (sister)
See Claflin family
Education
No formal education
Occupation
Suffragist, politician, feminist,writer.
Known for
Politicswomen's rightswomen's suffragefeminismcivil rights, anti-slavery,stockbrokerjournalismfree love
Signature
128x0https://img.tfd.com/wiki/thumbs/0/01/128px-Victoria_Woodhull_signature.svg.png[/img]
Victoria Claflin Woodhull, later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman'ssuffrage movement.
In 1872, Woodhull ran for President of the United States. While manyhistorians and authors agree that Woodhull was the first woman to run forPresident of the United States, some have questioned that priority givenissues with the legality of her run. They disagree with classifying it as atrue candidacy because she was younger than the constitutionallymandated age of 35. However, election coverage by contemporarynewspapers does not suggest age was a significant issue. Thepresidential inauguration was in March 1873. Woodhull's 35th birthdaywas in September 1873.
An activist for women's rights and labor reforms, Woodhull was also anadvocate of being able to freely love who you choose, with the nobility offree love, by which she meant the freedom to marry, divorce, and bearchildren without government interference.[2]
Woodhull twice went from rags to riches, her first fortune being made onthe road as a magnetic healer[3] before she joined the spiritualistmovement in the 1870s.[4] While authorship of many of her articles isdisputed (many of her speeches on these topics were collaborationsbetween Woodhull, her backers, and her second husband, Colonel JamesBlood[5]), her role as a representative of these movements was powerful.Together with her sister, Tennessee Claflin, she was the first woman tooperate a brokerage firm on Wall Street;[6] they were among the firstwomen to found a newspaper, Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly, which beganpublication in 1870.[7]
Woodhull was politically active in the early 1870s, when she wasnominated as the first woman candidate for the United States presidency.Woodhull was the candidate in 1872 from the Equal Rights Party,supporting women's suffrage and equal rights; her running mate wasabolitionist leader Frederick Douglass. Her arrest on obscenity chargesa few days before the election, for publishing an account of the allegedadulterous affair between the prominent minister Henry Ward Beecherand Elizabeth Tilton, added to the sensational coverage of her candidacy.[8]


Early life and education
She was born Victoria California Claflin, the seventh of ten children (six ofwhom survived to maturity),[9] in the rural frontier town of HomerLicking County, Ohio. Her mother, Roxanna "Roxy"[9] Hummel Claflin, wasillegitimate and illiterate.[10] She had become a follower of the Austrianmystic Franz Mesmer and the new spiritualist movement. Her father,Reuben "Old Buck"[9] Buckman Claflin,[11][12] was a con man and snakeoil salesman.[9] He came from an impoverished branch of theMassachusetts-based Scots-American Claflin family, semi-distantcousins to Governor William Claflin.[12]
Woodhull was whipped by her father, according to biographer TheodoreTilton.[13] Biographer Barbara Goldsmith claimed she was also starvedand sexually abused by her father when still very young.[14] She basedher incest claim on a quote from Theodore Tilton's biography, "But theparents, as if not unwilling to be rid of a daughter whose sorrow wasripening her into a woman before her time, were delighted at theunexpected offer."[15][16] Biographer Myra MacPherson disputesGoldsmith's claim that "Vickie often intimated that he sexually abusedher" as well as the accuracy of Goldsmith's quote, "Years later, Vickiewould say that Buck made her 'a woman before my time.'"[14]Macpherson wrote "Not only did Victoria not say this, there was no 'often'involved, nor was it about incest."[17]
Woodhull believed in spiritualism – she referred to "Banquo's Ghost" from Shakespeare's Macbeth – because it gave herbelief in a better life. She said that she was guided in 1868 by Demosthenes to what symbolism to use supporting hertheories of Free Love.[18]
As they grew older, Victoria became close to her sister, Tennessee Celeste Claflin (called Tennie), seven years her junior andthe last child born to the family. As adults they collaborated in founding a stock brokerage and newspaper in New York City.[9]
By age 11, Woodhull had only three years of formal education, but her teachers found her to be extremely intelligent. She wasforced to leave school and home with her family when her father, after having "insured it heavily,"[3] burned the family's rottinggristmill. When he tried to get compensated by insurance, his arson and fraud were discovered; he was run off by a group oftown vigilantes.[3] The town held a "benefit" to raise funds to pay for the rest of the family's departure from Ohio.[3]
Marriages
First marriage and family
220x0https://img2.tfd.com/wiki/thumbs/7/79/220px-Victoria-Woodhull-by-Bradley-%26-Rulofson.jpg[/img]
Victoria Woodhull, c. 1860s
When she was 14, Victoria met 28-year-old Canning Woodhull (listed as"Channing" in some records), a doctor from a town outside Rochester, New York. Her family had consulted him to treat the girl for a chronic illness.Woodhull practiced medicine in Ohio at a time when the state did not requireformal medical education and licensing. By some accounts, Woodhull claimedto be the nephew of Caleb Smith Woodhullmayor of New York City from1849 to 1851; he was a distant cousin.
They were married on November 20, 1853.[19][20] Their marriage certificate was recorded in Cleveland on November 23,1853, when Victoria was two months past her 15th birthday.[3][21]
Victoria soon learned that her new husband was an alcoholic and a womanizer. She often had to work outside the home tosupport the family. She and Canning had two children, Byron and Zulu (later called Zula) Maude Woodhull.[22] According toone account, Byron was born with an intellectual disability in 1854, a condition Victoria believed was caused by herhusband's alcoholism. Another version recounted that her son's disability was caused by a fall from a window. After theirchildren were born, Victoria divorced her husband and kept his surname.[4]
Second marriage
About 1866,[23] Woodhull married Colonel James Harvey Blood, who also was marrying for a second time. He had served inthe Union Army in Missouri during the American Civil War, and had been elected as city auditor of St. Louis, Missouri.
Free love
Woodhull's support of free love likely started after she discovered the infidelity of her first husband Canning. Women whomarried in the United States during the 19th century were bound into the unions, even if loveless, with few options to escape.Divorce was limited by law and considered socially scandalous. Women who divorced were stigmatized and often ostracizedby society. Victoria Woodhull concluded that women should have the choice to leave unbearable marriages.[24]
Woodhull believed in monogamous relationships, although she also said she had the right to change her mind: the choice tomake love or not was in every case the woman's choice (since this would place her in an equal status to the man, who hadthe capacity to rape and physically overcome a woman, whereas a woman did not have that capacity with respect to a man).[25] Woodhull said:
Quote:To woman, by nature, belongs the right of sexual determination. When the instinct is aroused in her, then andthen only should commerce follow. When woman rises from sexual slavery to sexual freedom, into theownership and control of her sexual organs, and man is obliged to respect this freedom, then will thisinstinct become pure and holy; then will woman be raised from the iniquity and morbidness in which she nowwallows for existence, and the intensity and glory of her creative functions be increased a hundred-fold . . .[26]

In this same speech, which became known as the "Steinway speech," delivered on Monday, November 20, 1871 in Steinway Hall, New York City, Woodhull said of free love:
Quote:"Yes, I am a Free Lover. I have an inalienable, constitutional and natural right to love whom I may, to love as longor as short a period as I can; to change that love every day if I please, and with that right neither you nor any lawyou can frame have any right to interfere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this